Snowy River Man coming out in print!

Country SecretsI’m thrilled to announce my first novel, Snowy River Man, will be coming out in print with MIRA, as part of an anthology called, Country Secrets.

Today I can reveal the cover. What do you think?

My friends and family will know what a big deal this is for me – finally, after all these years of writing, to have a printed version of something I’ve written.

If you’d like to preorder a copy of Country Secrets, you can find it at the following book stores.

By the way, I’m looking forward to reading both Mandy’s and Sarah’s stories – I’m told by avid rural romance fans they are both excellent.

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“Celebrating” Australia Day – book giveaways and reflections

2016australiaday-bloghopAustralia Day always brings mixed feelings for me. Many of my friends prefer to think of it as “Invasion Day”. Some demand we change our national day to a date less reminiscent of our tragic treatment of our Indigenous peoples and their long history of suffering and mourning.

At the same time, I remember many happy times in childhood, enjoying the sun, surf and swimming, watching ferries on Sydney harbour and planes fly by overhead, days brought to a dramatic end with a display of fireworks. On those days, I seemed surrounded by people celebrating this beautiful country of ours, a country where so many of us are free because of the trek our ancestors made across the oceans, uncertain of their future, hoping to find a place where they could live side-by-side with others of different languages, faiths and ethnicities.

That’s the kind of Australia Day I would like to celebrate: one that recognises, with humility, that our right to call this land home is tentative; we are at home only because of the generosity and – at many times forced – hospitality of others whose home this has been for countless generations over many, many thousands of years.

So I say thank you to our Indigenous brothers and sisters, and hope that the suffering that this day causes you – and the causes of that suffering – may soon cease.

Now to the giveaways.

As part of Shelleyrae at Book’d Out’s Australia Day Giveaway blog hop, I’m offering two giveaways. On my Lizzy Chandler blog, I’m giving away copies of my ebooks to three lucky winners, their choice of either Snowy River Man or By Her Side. On the Australian Women Writers Challenge blog, I’m giving away a copy of Snowy River Man, plus ebook copies of the latest novels of my critique partners, D B Tait, Kandy Shepherd and Cathleen Ross.

So head on over to win a copy or two!

And remember…

check author. Source: http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/exhibition/aborigines/xabor.html#31facingenemy

governor daveys proclamation to aborigines 1816 nla.pic-an7878675-vVieillefemme

Note: I discovered the images above while undertaking research for a Master of Teaching at UNE (not completed). For one unit, I created a “WebQuest” on creating digital poetry called, “Aboriginality, Poetry and Song.” Most of these images were taken from an exhibition of the National Library, the record of which is no longer available online. The titles of the pictures are: Dance at the Conclusion of the Cavarra Ceremonies (1845), P E Warburton, ‘Facing the Enemy’ (1875), Governor Daveys’ Proclamation to Aborigines (1816, source: nla.pic-an7878675-v) and Henri Perron, d’Arc, ‘La Vieille Harguant des Natifs’ (1870).

Today’s the day – Snowy River Man released!

It’s here!

Lizzy Chandler

imageMy debut romance novel Snowy River Man is released today.

Snowy River Man is the story of city girl Katrina Delaney who dreams of a missing boy. She discovers it’s the son of a man she met years ago with whom she had a one night stand, Jack Fairley, a grazier from the Snowy Mountains Shire. Katrina is determined to help find Jack’s son, despite the painful memories that begin to surface, taking her back to a time in her life she would rather forget.

Here’s what one reviewer had to say:

I thoroughly enjoyed Snowy River Man which is the debut novel for Aussie author Lizzy Chandler. A nice mixture of suspense and romance, with a gritty plot and delightful characters; the word pictures painted of the countryside around the Snowy Mountains, the chill in the air, the blackness of the night sky plus the vividness and brightness of the stars…

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Stella Prize Longlist announced

The Stella Prize longlist has been announced.

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  • Foreign Soil by Maxine Beneba Clarke
  • The Strays by Emily Bitto
  • Only the Animals by Ceridwen Dovey
  • This House of Grief by Helen Garner
  • Golden Boys by Sonya Hartnett
  • The Invisible History of the Human Race by Christine Kenneally
  • The Eye of the Sheep by Sophie Laguna
  • The Golden Age by Joan London
  • Laurinda by Alice Pung
  • Nest by Inga Simpson
  • Heat and Light by Ellen van Neerven
  • In My Mother’s Hands by Biff Ward

I’ve read two of these books, Helen Garner’s House of Grief and Sonya Hartnett’s Golden Boys (review here). How about you?

~

Further details can be found on The Stella Prize website.

Reblogged: Thank you for 2014! What’s new for 2015

AWW 2015 badge

AWW 2015 badge

Reblogged from the new Australian Women Writers website.

In 2014, the Australian Women Writers challenge attracted 1578 reviews of books by Australian women (and there may be more to come). That’s a fantastic achievement and I want to thank you all – readers, bloggers, writers and the AWW team volunteers.

As you probably know, the AWW challenge was established at the end of 2011 in response to discussions about gender bias in the reviewing of books by women. (If you’re new to the challenge, you can read more here.) Although I ran the challenge for the first year, it has always been a team effort, with the real work being done by the many book bloggers – mostly women and a few men – who for the past three years have been reading and reviewing books by Australian women. We have posted our reviews on blogs, Goodreads and other platforms; chatted about them on Twitter and Facebook; talked about the challenge at festivals; seen it mentioned on writers’ centre websites and in mainstream media; and we’ve encouraged others to join us – both as participants and as volunteers to help run the challenge websites. Behind the scenes, the AWW team has been posting regular round-ups of the reviews linked to the challenge, updating the database with images of book covers, and checking links entered in the “Link Your Review” form.

In my case, as well as contributing to the above tasks, I’ve tried to read posts by challenge participants, responding sometimes with a “like”, sometimes with a comment. Via Twitter, I’ve broadcast reviews of participants who tweet including “@auswomenwriters” or the challenge hashtag, and I’ve kept an eye on the AWW Facebook page. As much work as this involves, I know there are many reviews I haven’t read or responded to, and I feel I’ve done comparatively little to show challenge participants how much their efforts are appreciated. At least one person I know, an early member of the challenge, didn’t sign up this year after noticing their “likes” and “comments” on their reviews on Goodreads had dropped off.

This signals to me the importance of continuing to invite others to help build a community of readers, and show participants just how much their reviews are contributing to something bigger. This year saw the #readwomen2014 campaign on Twitter, a global movement with similar aims to the AWW challenge. It was a great success, but ongoing work is still needed. Both VIDA and the Stella Award published counts of reviews in literary journals during 2013. The counts demonstrate that the number of reviews of books by women continues to lag behind the number of reviews of books by men. We won’t know the count for 2014 until next year – and hopefully there’ll be an improvement. But whatever it is, we can be confident that we’re doing our bit to help raise the profile of this important issue.

Why is it important?

Let’s not even go down the track of discussing the gender pay gap, statistics on violence towards women, the decreasing number of female CEOs and parliamentary ministers, or how the lack of acknowledgement of women’s achievements generally may help to perpetuate entrenched injustices. Let’s focus on the writers. The AustLit account on Twitter recently noted that its database has entries for 38 500 individual Australian women writers. (There are probably more, but some women aren’t identified as they published using initials.) But how many of those have you heard of? How many have you read? This morning, I was trawling through Librivox and Project Gutenberg Australia for free audio and ebooks of out-of-copyright books by Australian women. Just a quick glance at the lists makes it obvious how few books there are by women in comparison to books by men. If we want the voices of Australian women of the twenty-first century to go down in history, the work starts now, with us. Without records, without evidence books by Australian women are being read and appreciated, historians of the future may think they weren’t good enough to be remembered, when clearly this isn’t true.

The AWW Challenge will continue in 2015, with the aim of continuing to promote and support books by Australian women. Until now, we’ve had two websites, one for the blog and one for the review lists (or three, if you count the AWW Challenge Goodreads page). The new site is a work in progress, but it will have a searchable database, making it easier for readers to find participants’ reviews. My hope is readers – librarians, teachers, bloggers, writers and researchers – will follow the links and show appreciation by “liking” or commenting on the reviews of the books they discover. This will help consolidate and grow the AWW reading community. I’d also encourage people to subscribe to the AWW blog via email (see side bar) and discuss their reading on social media using the challenge hashtag: #aww2015. If you have any other ideas how we can raise the profile of Australian women writers, or if you’d like to volunteer to help behind the scenes or contribute to the AWW blog, please let me know.

So, who’s in for 2015? You can sign up here.

Introducing Lizzy Chandler – a new name, a new blog and a new story

When I was about seven I defaced the inside back cover of a picture book by writing my first story. I don’t remember much about it, except that it featured the Nativity. Instead of getting me into trouble, my act of vandalism gave me unexpected celebrity with my (usually distant) father. He said it should be printed out and sent in to the Catholic Weekly. Receiving that praise was the start of my lifelong ambition to be published in fiction.

Last year a good writer friend, Cathleen Ross, did a spontaneous psychic reading for me. She said my “guides” had just one message: I needed a good kick up the backside as I should have been submitting my work to publishers. As I’d once had a reading by an Indian psychic in Agra near the Taj Mahal, I was dubious. That psychic hadn’t picked me as a writer. Nevertheless, I listened to Cathleen. She suggested I approach Kate Cuthbert of Escape Publishing (the Australian digital arm of Harlequin) with one of my romance novels, a story that had been a finalist in the Clendon Award some years ago. After seeing the first three chapters, Kate requested the whole manuscript. A couple of weeks ago, she sent me an offer of publication.

This is it. My lifetime ambition is about to be realised, after years of rejections and near misses, and all the self-doubt and frustrations any aspiring author will know only too well.

While I’ve shared this news already to family, close friends and the Australian Women Writers team, I wanted to organise a few things before I went public with my news. The first thing I needed to do was to settle on a pen-name. (Anyone who has pronounced my surname, Lhuede, as “lewd” will understand why this isn’t a great name for romance.)

So I’ll be publishing under the name Lizzy Chandler.

Chandler is a family name that I’ve been able to trace back to the late eighteenth-century in Gloucestershire, UK. My great-, great-, great-, great-, great-grandmother was Sarah Chandler, on my mother’s side. Elizabeth is also a family name that goes back many generations, and my darling grandmother was always known as Lizzy, so I love my new name (and it’s much easier to spell).

If you’re a friend, family or writing acquaintance, if you participate in the Australian Women Writers challenge, and if you love a good story with romance and suspense, I hope you’ll like my Lizzy Chandler Facebook page, find me on Twitter @Lizzy_Chandler, and follow my new Lizzy Chandler blog. I’ll keep you posted when my book is out. It’ll  be available in digital format (ebook) all around the world.

In the meantime, I want to share this photo of the countryside that inspired my story, Her Man From Snowy River Country. It’s a cabin where we stay from time to time. I’ll keep the incredible tale of what happened when I was down there researching this story for another time.

Special thanks to my family and friends, the team and participants of the Australian Women Writers Challenge, and Kate at Escape Publishing. I’m thrilled that I’ll be a published author after all this time.

Photo by Rodney Weidland (used with permission)

Photo by Rodney Weidland (used with permission)

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